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There are a number of different ways of responding to students, as each situation is unique and individual to the setting, the student and the helper.

We learn from each interaction we have with students and this helps us to build up a range of experiences and responses. However, the hope is that this information will enable you to feel more confident and calm about what to do, as well as where to direct or get help for students and yourself in these situations.

What you should aim to do

Select the hyperlinks below.

There are a number of different ways of responding to students, as each situation is unique and individual to the setting, the student and the helper.

We learn from each interaction we have with students and this helps us to build up a range of experiences and responses. However, the hope is that this information will enable you to feel more confident and calm about what to do, as well as where to direct or get help for students and yourself in these situations.

What you should aim to do

The aim is for you to keep as neutral and calm on the outside, even if flustered or worried inside. We need to be able to support the student while, at the same time, supporting ourselves with what we may be feeling inside. By doing this we will allow their experiences to be acknowledged and dealt with in an 'alongside approach', rather than us grasp at straws and give a panicky, reactive response.

Further guidance

Select the hyperlinks below.

There are a number of different ways of responding to students, as each situation is unique and individual to the setting, the student and the helper.

We learn from each interaction we have with students and this helps us to build up a range of experiences and responses. However, the hope is that this information will enable you to feel more confident and calm about what to do, as well as where to direct or get help for students and yourself in these situations.

What you should aim to do

The aim is for you to keep as neutral and calm on the outside, even if flustered or worried inside. We need to be able to support the student while, at the same time, supporting ourselves with what we may be feeling inside. By doing this we will allow their experiences to be acknowledged and dealt with in an 'alongside approach', rather than us grasp at straws and give a panicky, reactive response.

Further guidance

Being well prepared and having thought things through in advance will equip you to feel more at ease and available to students who are distressed. Common sense and a kind approach go a very long way to help them not to let their worries multiply and snowball out of control. Allowing students to be heard and acknowledged without judgement is key to this process. Also keeping the 'door open' for them to return and feel valued is encouraging and validating for you both.